Disability in World History

istockphoto-purchased2Representation & Rights: Disability in History and the Arts  (CAT3, Spring 2021)

Disability is diversity, yet a manifestation of diversity that has often been ignored, marginalized, and even denigrated. To overcome such bias, people with disabilities confronted cultural stigma and rigid boundaries used to deprive them of fundamental civil and human rights. Representation & Rights draws on the arts – in film, play, and written word – to examine this long struggle for social and political change, highlighting the stories of people with disabilities — advocates, artists, authors — who forged a pathway for inclusion.   Course topics include: advocacy and protest, accessibility, racism and eugenics, the impact of war, institutionalization vs. independent living, and perspectives on the role of technology.   This course is co-taught by Professors Matthew Herbst and Lisa Porter (Theatre & Dance). NOTE:  This course has asynchronous remote lectures, synchronous remote sections, and does not have a synchronous final exam.

IMG_3448Professors Matthew Herbst and Lisa Porter  previously co-taught a seminar on disability & Turkish history and took their class to Istanbul to volunteer with disability-related NGOs and schools:  Türk IMG_3495Anneler Derneği Özel Eğitim ve Rehabilitasyon Merkezi in Florya, Özel Eğitim Merkezi in Yeşilköy, İTO Özel Eğitim Merkezi in Bağcılar, Istanbul University, and İnsan Toplum ve Teknoloji Derneği.